29 - Chandra Coleman Harris, Revlon

Episode Thumbnail
00:00
00:00
This is a podcast episode titled, 29 - Chandra Coleman Harris, Revlon. The summary for this episode is: <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In Episode 29 of Earned, Conor sits down with Chandra Coleman Harris, General Manager of beauty giant Revlon. We dive into Revlon’s digital transformation during the pandemic, and learn how the brand leveraged lighthearted “edutainment” content, along with its #ButItHelps campaign, to stay connected with audiences. We also explore how Revlon amped up product categories like nails and hair color as consumers turned to at-home self-care. Chandra discusses the advantages and challenges of existing in multiple product categories, before sharing the tools Revlon uses to observe and anticipate shifts in consumer behavior. We then chat through Chandra’s own career journey, and she and Conor dissect the “night and day” differences between digital marketing back in 2008 and today. Finally, we hear how Chandra’s marketing approach changed following the birth of her daughters, including why she feels a greater responsibility to “shape and mold what beauty stands for and how beauty is brought to life.” </span></p>

DESCRIPTION

In Episode 29 of Earned, Conor sits down with Chandra Coleman Harris, General Manager of beauty giant Revlon. We dive into Revlon’s digital transformation during the pandemic, and learn how the brand leveraged lighthearted “edutainment” content, along with its #ButItHelps campaign, to stay connected with audiences. We also explore how Revlon amped up product categories like nails and hair color as consumers turned to at-home self-care. Chandra discusses the advantages and challenges of existing in multiple product categories, before sharing the tools Revlon uses to observe and anticipate shifts in consumer behavior. We then chat through Chandra’s own career journey, and she and Conor dissect the “night and day” differences between digital marketing back in 2008 and today. Finally, we hear how Chandra’s marketing approach changed following the birth of her daughters, including why she feels a greater responsibility to “shape and mold what beauty stands for and how beauty is brought to life.”